Melbourne Airport

Complaints

Airservices manages enquiries and complaints about aircraft noise and operations through the Noise Complaints and Information Service (NCIS). The information below is collected by the NCIS for the purpose of complaint management, analysis of issues and identification of causal factors. For this reason we refer to ‘complainants’ and ‘issues’. Complainants are people who contacted the NCIS. While some people submitted enquiries or comments rather than complaints, all are referred to as “complainants”. Issues are the primary concern they raised.

July - September 2018

Complainants

Fifty two individual complainants were recorded in quarter three of 2018. This is a slight decrease from 59 complainants in quarter two 2018. In 2017 in quarter three there were 50 complainants.

Issues

Standard flight path movements affected 92 percent or 48 complainants in quarter three.

Night Movements were a concern to two complainants and a single complainant was recorded under the issues of Unusual movements and the New Runway Project.

Chart 1: Runway directions and number of complainants affected quarter one, two and three 2018

Chart showing a comparison of complainants affected by use of different runway directions during quarter 1, quarter 2 and quarter 3

Runway 34 arrivals were the main concern to complaints in quarter three and these affected 65 percent of all complainants. The use of Runway 34 begins to decline in the later months of the year. Weather diversions were a concern to one complainant.

Required navigation aid calibration occurred in September. This calibration often requires low and unusual flying patterns, no complainants were attributable to this event.

Suburbs

In quarter three 34 separate suburbs across the greater Melbourne basin recorded complainants.

Twenty six suburbs recorded a single complainant.

The suburbs which recorded the most complainants were:

  • Avondale Heights with seven complainants
  • Newport and West Footscray with four complainants each.
All of these suburbs were affected by Runway 34 arrivals. West Footscray was also affected by Runway 34 arrivals at night.
April - June 2018

Complainants

There were 59 individual complainants during the second quarter of 2018. This is an increase from 46 complainants in quarter one 2018, and from 52 complainants in the first quarter of 2017.

The main reason for the increase in complainants was due to the number of complainants raising concerns about the upcoming airspace changes. This is explained further under Issues below.

Issues

The issue of Standard flight path movements continues to be the main issue raised this quarter, and affected 49 percent of complainants. There has been a decrease in complainants raising the issue of Night Movements, from 28 percent in quarter 1 to 5 percent in this quarter. The overall rise in the number of complainants is due to increased contacts regarding the upcoming airspace changes which was raised by 44 percent of complainants. This relates to changes due to commence in November 2018, which were announced by Airservices Australia in May 2018. Most complainants believed these changes had already commenced. Complainants raising this issue contacted Airservices in May or June. More information on these changes can be found on the Airservices website.

Chart 1 below provides a breakdown of the Standard flight path movements issue with a comparison to quarter one 2018. It is important to note that some complainants may raise more than one issue.

Chart 1: Breakdown of Standard flight path issue and comparison with quarter one 2018

Breakdown of standard flight path issue with comparison to quarter 1 2018

As can be seen there has been a decrease in complainants raising the issue of Runway 16 Departures and a rise in complainants raising the issue of Runway 34 Arrivals. This reflects the rise in the numbers of movements on Runway 34 in this quarter and the corresponding decrease in Runway 16 movements. Historically use of Runway 34 increases in the cooler months, with Runway 16 use decreasing, due to the prevailing winds. This is shown in Chart 2 below. Further information on this can be found in the section on Runways.

Chart 2: Melbourne Airport Runway Usage 2015 to 2018

Chart showing runway usage from 2015 - June 2018

Suburbs

Thirty-three separate suburbs recorded a complainant in quarter two. The suburbs recording the most complainants were; Spotswood with seven complainants, Altona with six complainants, and Altona Meadows, Newport, Richmond, South Kingsville, and Williamstown with three complainants each.

With the exception of Richmond complainants and one complainant from South Kingsville, all the other complainants from these suburbs were concerned with the proposed airspace changes due to be implemented in November 2018. The Richmond complainants and the other South Kingsville complainant were concerned with Standard flight path movements for Runway 34 Arrivals.

Complainants concerned with the proposed airspace changes come from nine separate suburbs; all these suburbs are adjacent to the section of Port Phillip Bay where the level of controlled airspace is proposed to be lowered.

Twenty-two separate suburbs recorded a single complainant.

January - March 2018

Complainants

There were 46 individual complainants during the first quarter of 2018. This is a slight increase from 43 complainants in quarter four 2017, but is a decrease from 52 complainants in the first quarter of 2017.

Issues

Standard flight path movements were raised by 67 percent of complainants in quarter one. The issue which caused an increase of complainants in this quarter was Night Movements. Thirteen complainants raised this issue in quarter one, while only six complainants raised this issue in quarter four 2017.

The Melbourne Grand Prix was held in March, and jet aircraft movements increased over this month (see Movements). While no complainants were attributed to this event, the increase of operations may have contributed to the annoyance factor for residents.

Chart 1: Issues and the number of complainants affected

Issues and complainants

Chart 2 shows the number of complainants across all issues and the runway direction which affected them, and a comparison for quarter four 2017. It is important to note that some complainants may raise more than one issue.

Chart 2: Runway directions and number of complainants affected

Runway directions

An increase in complainants occurred in the issue of Night movements and the majority of complainants were concerned regarding Runway 16 Departures, as shown in Chart 3. Historically the use of Runway 16/34 increases over quarter four and declines during quarter one and two. During this quarter there were 50 percent more movements on Runway 16, than Runway 34.

Chart 3: Runway directions and percentage of complainants affected by each

Night movements

Suburbs

Twenty eight separate suburbs recorded a complainant in quarter one. The suburbs recording the most complainants were; St Albans and Thomastown with four complainants each and Keilor, Dallas and Deer Park with three complainants each.

The residents of St Albans, Keilor and Deer Park were concerned regarding Night Movements.

Thomastown and Dallas were affected by Runway 27 arrivals, while Keilor and Deer Park were affected by Runway 16 Departures.

A missed approach also caused concern to a resident of Dallas.

Sixteen separate suburbs recorded a single complainant.

2017 Overview

Complainants

There were 148 complainants during 2017. This is a significant reduction from 210 complainants in 2016.

Issues

Chart 1 shows the issues raised by complainants in 2017. 82 percent of complainants were affected by standard flight path movements in 2017. Standard flight path movements are those where aircraft are tracking within the normal parameters of known flight paths and are within the normal altitude range for their position on the flight path.

The unusual movements were due to traffic management requirements, weather diversions and radar departures. Traffic management techniques are used to ensure that aircraft are separated in line with the international standards that air traffic controllers apply. This means that at times aircraft must be taken off the normal flight paths to ensure safety. Radar departures are aircraft that are given an individual heading by air traffic control rather than the standard flight path.

During 2017 the Noise Complaints and Information Service revised the issue of night movements to include any event where a complainant advised that their sleep pattern was disturbed.

The issues of “not noise related” and “other” encompassed requests for information on the ANEF, information on how the airport manages the presence of bird life and requests regarding airline information. Such requests are referred to the relevant organisation where it can be identified.

Chart 1: Issues and the number of complainants affected by them in 2017

Issues

Chart 2 provides a comparison of the two main issues of standard flight path movements and night movements for 2017 and 2016; with the associated number of complainants.

Chart 2: Comparison of the two main issues of 2017 and 2016 and the number of complainants affected

Comparison 2016, 2017

Chart 3 shows the runway directions of concern, across all issues of 2017, indicated by the complainant.

Chart 3: Runway directions and percentage of complainants affected by each

Runway directions

Suburbs

Eighty-six suburbs across the greater Melbourne basin recorded complainants in 2017. Fifty-three of these suburbs recorded a single complainant.

All suburbs where complainants resided were affected by standard flight path movements. Avondale Heights and West Footscray were affected by Runway 34 arrivals. Keilor and St Albans were affected by Runway 16 departures; while Sunbury was affected by Runway 34 departures and the flight path changes of May 2017.

A comparison between the 2017 and 2016 suburbs recording the most complainants is shown in Chart 4.

Chart 4: Comparison of Suburbs recording the most complainants in 2017 and 2016

Suburbs

October - December 2017

Complainants

There were 43 individual complainants during the fourth quarter of 2017. This is a decrease from 51 complainants in the third quarter of 2017.

There were 148 individual complainants during 2017.

Issues

Required runway works continued in this quarter for both Runway 16/34 and Runway 09/27. When one runway is closed the other carries all the traffic, resulting in an increased load over affected suburbs.

As shown in Chart 1 below, standard flight path movements were raised by 76 percent of complainants in quarter four. Unusual movements were raised by four complainants and the reasons for the diversion from the standard flight path were radar departures and weather diversions.

Two complainants were affected by the flight path changes in May; one from Runway 27 departures and the other from Runway 34 Arrivals.

Chart 1: Issues

Issues

Chart 2 shows the number of complainants across all issues and the runway direction which affected them. It is important to note that some complainants may raise more than one issue.

Historically the use of Runway 16 increases in the later months of the year and this is reflected in the number of complainants for this runway direction in Chart 2

Chart 2: Runway directions and number of complainants affected

Runway directions

Suburbs

Thirty separate suburbs across the Melbourne basin were affected during quarter four. The suburbs recording the most complainants were St Albans with five complainants and Avondale Heights with four complainants.

St Albans residents continue to be affected by Runway 16 departures, both day and night. Avondale Heights is affected by Runway 34 arrivals as it is located within a direct line of the north south runway.

Twenty-one suburbs recorded a single complainant.

July - September 2017

Complainants

There were 51 individual complainants during the third quarter of 2017. This is an increase from 35 complainants in the second quarter of 2017, but is a decrease from quarter 3 2016, which recorded 58 complainants.

There have been 119 individual complainants for the year to date.

Issues

The NCIS continues to refine how issues are classified and applied. We have recently decided to classify all complaints regarding movements that are tracking on the relevant flight path and within the normal altitudes as Standard flight path movements. In our reporting to the community this will provide greater clarity about what can be expected in the normal course of operations at the airport. Unusual movements will only be used for commercial aircraft operating outside their usual flight paths at major airports. Examples of unusual movements will include, weather diversions, traffic management, radar departures, direct tracking and missed approaches.
The Night Movements category has been expanded beyond the previous 11pm – 6am hours to cover complainants who advise the NCIS that they have been disturbed by air traffic at any hour of the night.

Chart 1: Issues

Issues

The main issue raised was Standard flight path movements which affected 67 per cent of complainants. Three complainants were affected by flight path changes which commenced on 25 May 2017, these changes were to improve safety and were designed to avoid residential areas or to overfly areas that were previously over flown. The complainants who noticed these changes resided in Sunbury and Gisborne South. Sunbury was affected by arrivals to Runway 34, while Gisborne South residents are affected by departures from Runway 27.

Three complainants were affected by unusual movements. This issue encompasses unusual circumstances which require air traffic control to vary the usual flight paths and this means that at times aircraft may appear to be flying in unexpected ways. This may occur, for traffic management reasons (to ensure safe separation is maintained), due to the need to avoid storm cells or dangerous cloud formations (weather diversions), or to avoid high priority emergency aircraft including aircraft involved in fighting bush fires, search and rescue, medical or police operations. All these examples will affect the usual orderly flow of air traffic. Air traffic controllers must assess each situation, with safety being the paramount consideration and direct the traffic accordingly. This can result in aircraft flying outside the expected flight path. In this quarter all unusual movements were for traffic management reasons.

The issue of Other was regarding the presence of birds at the aerodrome, while the issue of Not noise related were enquiries which were the remit of individual airlines.

Chart 2: Flight Path Issues and percentage of complainants affected

Standard flight path issues

Suburbs

The required runway works continued in this quarter for both Runway 16/34 and Runway 09/27. This required closures for up to six hours both day and night. This concentrates air traffic to a single runway, which increases the frequency of the arrivals and departures over the suburbs which are in a direct line with the runways. An increase or concentration of air traffic results in an increase in the number of complainants from these suburbs.

40 separate suburbs across the Melbourne basin were affected during quarter 3. The suburbs recording the most complainants were Keilor Park and Sunbury with three complainants and Kew, Keilor, Thomastown, Airport West, Gisborne South and Avondale Heights with two complainants each.

Airport West, Avondale Heights, and Kew were all affected by Runway 34 arrivals and these operations also affected residents in another 13 suburbs. Keilor and Keilor Park were affected by Runway 16 departures, and residents of Keilor Park were also disturbed by Runway 16 departures by aircraft operating at night.

Runway 27 arrivals affected residents at Airport West and Thomastown and also another six suburbs. Sunbury and Gisborne South were affected by the flightpath changes explained in the issues section above.

Thirty-two suburbs recorded a single complainant.

April - June 2017

There were 35 complainants during the second quarter of 2017, which is a decrease from 52 complainants in the first quarter of 2017. This is a significant decrease for the same period last year where there were 73 complainants.

There have been 82 individual complainants for the year to date. This means that five complainants contacted us in both quarter one and quarter two. The other thirty complainants were contacting us for the first time for 2017.

Issues

The main issues raised were flight path issues including a perception that something had changed, the location of the flight path, increased frequency of movements and altitudes. These issues affected 86 percent of complainants.

Chart 1: Issues, quarter two

Issues, quarter two

Two complainants complained of flight path changes that occurred on 25 May 2017. These changes were to improve safety and were designed to avoid residential areas as far as possible, or to overfly areas that were already overflown. As a result of the changes the suburb of Melton is no longer overflown. The complainants who noticed these changes resided in Sunbury and Gisborne South.

The NCIS is continuing to refine how issues are classified and applied. A recent decision to classify all complaints about movements that occur between 11pm and 6am under the issue of Night Movements (rather than under other issues that may also be relevant such as Increased frequency and/or Change of/different/location of flight path) means that this issue is likely to become more prominent in future reports.

Chart 2: Runway directions complained of, quarter two

Runway directions, quarter two

Suburbs

During May and June both Runway 16/34 and Runway 09/27 were closed for up to six hours both day and night due to required runway works. This concentrated air traffic to a single runway, which increases the frequency of the arrivals and departures over the suburbs which are in a direct line with the runways. An increase or concentration of air traffic resulted in an increase in the number of complainants from these suburbs.

Twenty-four separate suburbs recorded complainants during quarter two. Eighteen suburbs recorded a single complainant.

The suburbs with more than one complainant were Avondale Heights with four complainants, Lalor and West Footscray with three complainants each and Richmond, Thomastown and Westmeadows with two complainants each.

Avondale Heights is primarily affected by Runway 34 arrivals (see Q1 2017 and Q3 2016). West Footscray and Richmond were also affected by Runway 34 arrivals.

Lalor and Thomastown are affected by Runway 27 arrivals.

January - March 2017

Issues

There were 52 complainants during the first quarter of 2017. This is an increase from 42 complainants in the fourth quarter of 2016, but considerably less than the number of complainants in quarter 1 of 2016 (76).

With the exception of one non-noise-related issue, all the other issues raised in the quarter were to do with flight paths, including increased frequency of use, altitudes and a perception that something had changed.

Chart 1: Issues

Issues, quarter 1

The majority of these complainants were concerned about Runway 16 departures. Due to Melbourne’s seasonal wind patterns, Runway 16 tends to be used more frequently in the warmer months when there are more southerly winds.

Chart 2: Runway directions complained of, quarter 1

Q1 Runway directions

Suburbs

Complainants in quarter one came from 34 suburbs across the greater Melbourne basin.

The suburbs recording the most complainants were Keilor with five complainants, St Albans with four complainants, and Avondale Heights with three complainants. Due to its close proximity to the airport, Keilor is impacted by all operations from the longer north-south runway, that is, both Runway 16 departures and Runway 34 arrivals. Avondale Heights is primarily affected by arrivals to Runway 34, but the western parts of the suburb may also experience departures from Runway 16. St Albans is affected by departures from Runway 16.

Nine other suburbs recorded two complainants each with 22 having one complainant each.

In total, complainants from 19 suburbs across Melbourne complained of increased departures from Runway 16.

2016 Overview

In 2016 the total number of individual complainants was 210.

Issues

There were 178 complainants concerned about flight path issues in 2016. These included concerns about increased frequency, a desire for a change of flight path and/or concern about the location of the flight path, or a perception that something had changed.

Chart 1: Issues 2016


 

Issues 2016

The most complained-of runway configuration was Runway 34 arrivals. Runway 34 was used extensively in 2016 due to unusual and unseasonal wind patterns. This can be seen in chart 2. The fact that fewer complaints were raised about Runway 34 departures reflects the smaller population to the north of the airport. Chart 3 shows the number of complainants affected by each runway direction.

Chart 2: Runway 34 use 2012-2016

Runway 34 use 2012-2016

Chart 3: Number of complainants affected by each runway direction

Number of complainants affected by each runway direction

Suburbs

There were three suburbs with ten or more complainants in 2016: Avondale Heights with 22 and Keilor and St Albans with ten complainants each.These suburbs are all affected by operations from the main runway at Melbourne Airport. They are affected by both arrivals and departures, arrivals if the wind is northerly and departures if the wind direction is mainly southerly. Their proximity to the airport means that the aircraft are quite low over these suburbs.

Nine suburbs had between five and nine complainants.

Chart 4: Suburbs with five or more complainants, 2016

Suburbs with five or more complainants

Six suburbs had four complainants and five suburbs had three complainants. Thirteen suburbs had two complainants and 52 suburbs across the Melbourne basin recorded a single complainant.

October - December 2016

There were 42 complainants during the fourth quarter of 2016, which is a reduction from 58 complainants in the third quarter.

Issues

In quarter four the majority of complainants were concerned about arrivals to Runways 27 and 34. Runway 34 use was higher than usual for that time of year in October and December, although it dipped to normal levels for that month in November. Runway 27 usage peaked for the quarter in October at a slightly higher level than usual for that month, but decreased to expected levels in November and December. Complainants’ concerns included increased frequency and a perception something had changed.

Chart 1: Issues

Issues

Extensive runway maintenance work was conducted during the quarter at night. This interrupted use of the preferred night-time runway configuration of arrivals to Runway 16 and departures from Runway 27.

Suburbs

The suburbs recording the most complainants were Attwood, Avondale Heights and Yarraville; with three complainants each.

Attwood is in close proximity to the east-west runway at Melbourne Airport. Unusually, this quarter they were affected by departures off Runway 09 to the east. Runway 09 is the least used of any of the runways and it is the least preferred runway under the noise abatement procedures. Because it is used infrequently it is particularly noticeable to residents when it is used.

The complainants in Yarraville were affected by aircraft arriving on Runway 34, especially in the late evening and early morning. Avondale Heights is affected by departures from Runway 34.

July - September 2016

Issues

There were 58 complainants during the third quarter. This is a reduction from the second quarter (73) and the first quarter (76). For the year-to-date, a total of 196 individual complainants have contacted NCIS.

This quarter there was an increase in contacts from complainants under the Runway 27 arrival and departure paths. This was due to planned runway maintenance work on Runway 16/34, the longer north south runway. This work required the full closure of the runway between 12.30 am and 5.30 am, and as a result aircraft were required to use Runway 27. This runway maintenance is expected to continue into the fourth quarter and will also include maintenance on Runway 27.

Two issues were raised more frequently than others this quarter:

  • Increased frequency
  • Change of, different, or location of flight path
Increased frequency

22 complainants were concerned about increased frequency of movements. The issue of Runway 27 arrivals is directly related to the planned runway maintenance explained above. Concerns about Runway 34 arrivals are related to the predominant northerly wind conditions during the quarter, resulting in greater use of Runway 34.

Chart 1: Breakdown of Increased frequency issues raised

“YMML” is the airport code for Melbourne. The numbers (34, 16, 09 etc) refer to runway directions.
Melbourne issues July - September 2016

Change of, different, or location of flight path

25 complainants were concerned that the flight path was located over their area, or felt that the flight path had changed, or was different from usual. Concerns about use of Runway 27 can be attributed to the maintenance work on Runway 16/34 that resulted in more traffic using Runway 27, as discussed above. Concerns about use of Runway 34 flow from the predominant northerly wind conditions.

Chart 2: Breakdown of Change of, different, or location of flight path issues raised

“YMML” is the airport code for Melbourne. The numbers (34, 16, 09 etc) refer to runway directions.

Melbourne issues July - September 2016

Suburbs

No suburb recorded five or more complainants in this quarter.

The suburb that recorded the most complainants was Avondale Heights. Residents in Avondale Heights were concerned about both of the major issues listed above. The suburb of Avondale Heights is approximately 8km from Melbourne Airport and is located directly under the extended runway centreline of the main north/south runway 16/34.

When the wind is from a northerly direction Avondale Heights will be affected by the majority of all arriving aircraft to Melbourne Airport. In times of inclement weather this situation will increase. When the wind is from a southerly direction Avondale Heights is also affected by departing aircraft from Melbourne Airport. Avondale Heights will receive some respite when operations are confined to the smaller crossing runway 09/27. However, even when this runway is in use larger international aircraft may still require the use longer runway for operational reasons.

April - June 2016

Issues

There were 73 complainants during the second quarter, three more than in the first quarter. For the year to date there have been 137 “unique” complainants, that is, NCIS has been contacted by 137 individuals.

Two issues were raised more frequently than others this quarter:

  • Increased frequency
  • Change of, different, or location of flight path
Increased frequency

37 complainants were concerned about increased frequency of movements. Most complainants raising the issue of increased frequency came from suburbs affected by arrivals to Runway 34. Runway 34 use typically increases during the winter months due to seasonal wind patterns. In the month of May, Runway 34 use was higher than at any point since 2007. Use in April and June was not as high, but was still higher than previous years. This was due to the specific wind patterns experienced this year.

Chart 1: Breakdown of Increased frequency issues raised

“YMML” is the airport code for Melbourne. The numbers (34, 16, 09 etc) refer to runway directions.

Melbourne issues April - June 2016

Change of, different, or location of flight path

25 complainants were concerned that the flight path was located over their area, or felt that the flight path had changed, or was different from usual. There have been no changes in flight paths for Melbourne. However, changing seasonal weather patterns create the perception that something has changed. The discussion above for the issue of Increased frequency is also relevant to this issue: the majority of complainants came from areas affected by Runway 34 arrivals.

Some complainants raising this issue queried unusual movements outside the normal flight paths. “Traffic management” is the term used to refer to situations where an aircraft is directed off the usual flight path by air traffic control so that separation can be maintained between it and other aircraft. This can be required for a variety of reasons. This may occur during very busy periods when the airspace is congested to ensure the efficient flow of traffic. It may also occur if there are emergency services operations occurring in the vicinity, for example, police, medical or rescue operations.

Chart 2: Breakdown of Change of, different or location of flight path issues raised

“YMML” is the airport code for Melbourne. The numbers (34, 16, 09 etc) refer to runway directions.

Melbourne issues April - June 2016

Suburbs

This quarter there was only one suburb with five or more complainants: Avondale Heights. Avondale Heights is adjacent to the approach path from the south and therefore is affected by arrivals to Runway 34 which peaked this quarter as discussed above. There were 14 complainants from Avondale Heights in the quarter. For the year to date, NCIS has been contacted by 17 individual complainants from this suburb.

 

January - March 2016

Issues

There were 76 complainants during the first quarter. Two issues were raised more frequently than others:

  • Flight Path, increased frequency of use
  • Runway selection
Flight path, increased frequency of use

22 complainants were concerned about increased frequency of aircraft movements.

During this quarter, use of Runway 16 increased from the previous quarter. Runway 16 use typically increases during the summer months due to seasonal wind patterns, specifically, the predominance of southerly winds. This increased use was reflected in contacts from complainants affected by Runway 16 arrivals (from the north) or departures (to the south).

In addition, Runway 09 usage unusually peaked in January at the highest point for this month since 2007. This was due to the wind conditions. The use of this runway is typically low because it is the least preferred under the noise abatement procedures. Therefore, whenever it is used it is particularly noticeable to residents.

Chart 1: Breakdown of Flight path issues raised

“YMML” is the airport code for Melbourne. The numbers (34, 16, 09 etc) refer to runway directions.

Melbourne issues January - March 2016

Runway selection

23 complainants were concerned about runway selection.

Runway selection is based on wind direction and weather conditions, traffic volume and noise abatement procedures. Aircraft primarily take off and land into wind for safety and performance reasons. Therefore, as the wind direction changes, the runway in operation may also change depending on the strength of the wind. During the summer months varying wind and thunderstorm activity is typical for this quarter which affects operational runway selection.
Runway 16 for departures (to the south) increased from the previous quarter, which correlates to the discussion above for the issue of increased frequency. Conversely, arrivals to runway 34 (from the south) also occurred during this quarter.

Arrivals to Runway 27 (from the east) decreased slightly in January and February and Runway 09 usage was uncommonly high in January as discussed above. Runway 34 arrivals (from the south) had decreased compared to the previous quarter.

Chart 2: Breakdown of Runway selection issues raised

“YMML” is the airport code for Melbourne. The numbers (34, 16, 09 etc) refer to runway directions.

Melbourne issues January - March 2016

Suburbs

This quarter there were three suburbs with five or more complaints: Keilor (9), St Albans (6) and Keilor Park (5), each are located to the south or south-west of the Airport and are affected by the southern departure path from Runway 16 which had a high level of usage during this first quarter.
Keilor and Keilor Park are also affected by the arrival flight path to Runway 34 arrivals (from the south).