Brisbane Airport

Investigations & Community Consultation

Airservices proactively works with the airport and the community to investigate, trial and implement changes to improve aircraft noise outcomes.

Investigations conducted and noise improvements implemented at Brisbane Airport include:

Increased Smart Tracking use
The Runway 01 Instrument Landing System (ILS) flight path is frequently used due to the high volume of traffic and limited runway capacity. Ms Terri Butler MP proposed in early 2015 that greater use be made of the Smart Tracking (RNP) flight paths to provide residents under the ILS flight path with some relief.

Airservices redesigned the Runway 01 Smart Tracking flight paths to allow air traffic control greater flexibility for sequencing. This was implemented in September 2015. Monitoring of use and of complaints data was conducted from October 2015 to January 2016.

Prior to implementation of the new procedure, use was consistently between 3-5 per cent of arriving jet aircraft. Since October 2015 the use has increased steadily each month.

Heavy international departures at night
Airservices investigated whether heavy jets could turn left instead of right after departure from Runway 19 at night, and whether there were any other options for noise sharing at night.

A number of alternative routes are used for departures from Runway 19. Data analysis indicated that the departure paths at night are concentrated. Allowing a left turn, or any other noise sharing method, would expose new parts of the community to noise levels above 60 dB(A) at night. This level would be considered potentially significant under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act. The investigation found that the best noise outcome was to maximise the use of reciprocal runway operations at night, and to work with international airlines to ensure maximum use of Runway 01 for departures over the bay.

Runway 19 departures over Ashgrove
Airservices investigated whether a noise improvement could be made for the Ashgrove area which is affected by departures from Runway 19. The investigation found that:

– Air traffic control airspace requirements do not allow changes over Ashgrove because the current airspace design is the most efficient and safe taking into account the restricted runway capacity due to the high volume of traffic
– any movement of the flight path would cause new parts of the community to be overflown. Moving noise from one part of the community to another is not considered to be a noise improvement.
– Ashgrove benefits from three noise abatement measures: reciprocal runway operations, the climb requirement for jets departing Runway 19 to reach 3000 feet by 13 kilometres, and the fact that departures from Runway 19 during the day is the least preferred runway use under the noise abatement procedures.

The introduction of the new runway in 2020 may present further opportunities to review air traffic management arrangements.

Runway 19 south-eastern departures realignment
Airservices was able to move the departure flight path to the south-east from Runway 19 approximately 200 metres west in order to maximise use of non-residential land between the Brisbane River and Tingalpa. More information about the change. Read the Post Implementation Review

Community Consultation

Community Aviation Consultation Group (CACG) meetings are independent forums where community members and organisations can raise opinions and issues. These meetings address planning and development issues as well as operational matters such as aircraft noise and provide an opportunity for communication and consultation, although may not be public forums.

Airservices attends the Brisbane Airport Community Aviation Consultation Group meetings to provide information to the community and assist in discussions on aviation matters.